Ankle Sprain Injury

At Sports Physio Ireland we see a lot of people with ankle injuries. The most common clients with these injuries are just after a classic ankle sprain injury. They go over on the outside of their ankle, hear a ‘pop’ and feel pain when they try to walk. The ankle then becomes swollen over the next few hours, limiting the range of motion in the joint.

Your ankle joint has 3 ligaments that help stabilise the joint and protect you from ‘going over on it.’ An awkward fall or forced inversion injury can rupture these ligaments. Often causing bruising to the surrounding bone surface. Swelling occurs as the body realises it is injured and begins the healing process. This is why your joint swells, it is promoting blood flow to the area to initiate healing. People are often obsessed with getting rid of ankle swelling or stopping it all together, but it is necessary for the first 36 hours.

Swelling increases the temperature and pressure in the joint resulting in quite a sensitive, hot, red coloured  joint. The best course of management for an ankle sprain is take the weight off it, use crutches or a physio boot. Swelling can be controlled in the first 36 hours by keeping the foot elevated as often as possible, submerging it in a bucket of ice for one minute at least 10 times throughout day one & two after the injury has occurred. A stretchy bandage also helps in this 36 hour window to keep the swelling under control.

At this point you must try regain full joint movement, through balance and strengthening exercises after the initial 36 hours. Once you have sufficient ankle balance and strength you can progress to hopping, straight line running, followed by cutting and change of direction drills, before you return to training.

Joey Boland

Head Physiotherapist and Dublin Senior Hurler

www.sportsphysioireland.com

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Chronic Ankle Instability

Chronic ankle instability is an encompassing term used to classify an individual who presents with both mechanical and functional instability of the ankle joint following an initial lateral ankle sprain injury.

 

Mechanical Instability refers to measurable laxity of the ligaments, i.e. ligaments that are less stiff following injury, with some joint restrictions and synovial changes. Functional Instability is the lingering feeling of giving way or unsteady feeling which is generally attributed to neuromuscular and proprioceptive deficits.

 

Research has identified a number of potential reasons for long term issues with ankle instability after a sprain. One theory is that the ankle proprioception, where the joint is in space, is impaired creating an impaired reflex arc of the muscles that help stabilise the ankle joint. Swelling of the joint can cause the feedback system of the ankle joint to also alter and cause long term neuromuscular deficits.

 

So clinically, what can we do to help and reduce this occurring?

 

  • Reduce pain and swelling of the joint
  • Loading in functional tasks as soon as possible e.g. walking, running, cutting
  • Establish baseline strength and power
  • Improve proprioception of the ankle joint
  • Practice tasks that are important to your need
    • Cutting
    • Agility
    • Deceleration
    • Landing/jumping mechanics

 

Thomas Divilly

M.I.S.C.P., C.S.C.S.


How To Fix Your Push Up

The push up is one of the most basic exercises that you can do, but time and time again it is technically performed poorly.

We see issues from poor technique contribute to low back pain, knee issues, along with a number of other issues. So technique is vital to keep the body healthy.

So how do I, and the rest of the team in Sports Physio Ireland, see a push up? Simple really, think about a dynamic plank.

Quiet simply, the core should be engaged throughout the total body movement, and 9/10 in most injured or poorly trained clients this is the last thing that is thought about!

So How To Do The Perfect Push Up

• Hands directly under the shoulder, screw them into the ground.
• Squeeze the ass, tuck the tail bone under until you feel the lengthening of the abdominals
• Drive the heels to the back wall
• Slowly and controlled bring the chest to the ground, keeping the elbows close to the rib cage and drive up through the heels of the hand.

Harder than you think, but more bang for your buck!


Phase One Meniscal Tear Rehabilitation

 

When the knee suffers a meniscal and osteochondral fracture injury, it’s ability to absorb forces produced from stepping, running and cutting is diminshed. It’s essential to slowly and progressively load bear the joint in movements that simulate and compliment the movement patterns of the sport.

See the video of Sports Physio Ireland client, Ciaran, week one with Thomas, one of our Physiotherapists and Strength and Conditioning Specialists going through his initial rehabilitation.

 

 

 

 


Paralympic Football World Cup 2015

Back in June, SPI Physiotherapist Thomas Divilly travelled to England for two weeks to assist the Irish Paralympic Football Team at the Cerebral Palsy Football World Cup

Here’s a short piece on his experience during the tournament with the team.

‘I had the privilege of working as the Physiotherapist to the Irish Paralympic Football Team as they competed in the Cerebral Palsy Football World Cup in St. George’s Park, home of the England FA. There was a huge prize on offer for the guys. Qualification for the Paralympic Game in Rio 2016. And boy did they deliver!

The George's Park Dressing Room
The St. George’s Park Dressing Room

It was a hugely successful campaign as the team finished 6th overall.  Defeating Portugal, Australia and Argentina en route to a qualification spot. I was personally able to help keeping the guys fit and healthy throughout the tournament. We  finished the competition with a strong and healthy squad, just as we had started.

The George's Park Gym Facility.
The George’s Park Gym Facility.

Key components to achieving a fit and healthy squad throughout the two weeks of intense competition was implementing a good recovery system. This was achieved through proper nutrition & hydration, mobility work and pool sessions to keep the players in top condition.

I’m already looking forward to seeing the guys learn from this invaluable experience and push on to bigger and better things!’

Thomas


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