Calf Strain fixing

Calf strains are one of the most common and preventable injuries in GAA athletes. A calf strain involves a pull or tear to one or more of the muscles at the back of the lower leg. These muscles are responsible the movement at the ankle which involves pointing your toes away from the body and play an important role in your walking and running patterns. A calf strain will therefore make it difficult to walk or play pain free when injured.

The Rehab of a calf strain will depend on the severity of the injury. The severity of the strain can be divided into grade one, two or three.  A grade 3 strain is the most severe and can take up to 12 weeks to recover from.

Initial treatment consists of ice and rest for the first day or two but the player should be up jogging and doing bike sessions within the first 3-5 days. Strengthening will be key before returning to the biggest challenge… Sprinting

Here is a sample a few of the Mobility/Strengthening Exercises incorporated into rehab sessions.

Let us know how you get on.

Joey Boland


Paralympic Football World Cup 2015

Back in June, SPI Physiotherapist Thomas Divilly travelled to England for two weeks to assist the Irish Paralympic Football Team at the Cerebral Palsy Football World Cup

Here’s a short piece on his experience during the tournament with the team.

‘I had the privilege of working as the Physiotherapist to the Irish Paralympic Football Team as they competed in the Cerebral Palsy Football World Cup in St. George’s Park, home of the England FA. There was a huge prize on offer for the guys. Qualification for the Paralympic Game in Rio 2016. And boy did they deliver!

The George's Park Dressing Room
The St. George’s Park Dressing Room

It was a hugely successful campaign as the team finished 6th overall.  Defeating Portugal, Australia and Argentina en route to a qualification spot. I was personally able to help keeping the guys fit and healthy throughout the tournament. We  finished the competition with a strong and healthy squad, just as we had started.

The George's Park Gym Facility.
The George’s Park Gym Facility.

Key components to achieving a fit and healthy squad throughout the two weeks of intense competition was implementing a good recovery system. This was achieved through proper nutrition & hydration, mobility work and pool sessions to keep the players in top condition.

I’m already looking forward to seeing the guys learn from this invaluable experience and push on to bigger and better things!’

Thomas


Hamstring Rehab

The most commonly injured area that occurs in field based sports is the Hamstring. But why the hamstring? It’s an interesting question, with many different potential reasons.

Is it strong enough for the sport? Does it fatigue easy? Is it working too hard, making up for lack of support? Have you done enough sprinting in your training program?

Here is a few exercises that we have in our bag, that can help recruit better hip and hamstring strength and control.

We aim to get you strong to help prevent the possibility of injuring you Hamstring again.

Thomas Divilly

 


Plantar Pain

Commonly seen as pain in the heel (Plantar Pain) in the underside of the foot. Once thought of as an inflammatory issue, recently it has shown to be similar to the way a tendon overuse injury occurs. People get it with a sudden increase in running load, poor fitness levels, amongst other issues. It sounds all too common doesn’t it? 

But who cares? How do we solve the problem?

Strength training along with a progressive management of the exacerbating issue will really allow the symptoms to settle.

Try out some of these exercises below and give us some feedback

 

 

P.S If you would like some of the tools we use – check out http://www.blkboxfitness.com/collections/mobility


Reactive Neuromuscular Training


Reactive Neuromuscular Training (RNT), as the name suggests, refers to a type of training that involves the use of both our musculoskeletal and nervous systems. At SPI, we like to use RNT as part of our rehabilitation programmes when treating a variety of conditions, including ankle, knee, hip, back, and shoulder issues. 

RNT. A Fancy Name for a Great Rehab Tool

By adding in resistance to a joint using bands or pulleys, some of the smaller stabilising muscles are forced to ‘switch on’ and engage in order to maintain joint stability throughout the exercise. 
Training and rehabbing with the use of RNT can help to clean up a lot of dysfunctional movement patterns and therefore can help prevent future injury down the line too.


Check out some of the basics I like to use in the video below.


Riain Casey M.I.S.C.P.


I encourage all my running clients to have a personalised and specific 5 minute dynamic warm up.

This method of warming will dramatically decrease your chances of injury during your run, in comparison to your typical 5 to 10 minute light jog and stretch as a warm up.


Most of our clients are time poor so here is a ‘snappy’ dynamic warm up that I think you should try out before you next run.

Joey Boland MISCP