21 Day PT Trial

Want a 21 Day PT Trial?

Right now Sports Physio Ireland is offering you the chance to come in and try out our services for 21 days for only €59!

The 21 Day PT Trial will cover everything from strength and conditioning training to rehabilitation of an injury under the watchful eye of our chartered physiotherapists/trainers who will also be providing dietary advice to help you balance your eating habits.

Space is at a premium and we can only offer this trial to a limited number of people.

This is a HUGE discount and is definitely not to be missed!

We strive to provide the highest quality service in order to help you achieve your goals.

Sign up now by clicking the link below & and an expert trainer will be in touch.

https://functionalt.wufoo.eu/forms/p7b2w0s1qz85lt/

Sports Physio Ireland Team


What are Shin Splints?

 

What are Shin Splints? Shin Splints is a common term used among people to describe a pain in the leg in and around the area of their shin bone. A more specific diagnosis must be made however to successfully treat the symptoms. The traditional clinical use of the term shin splints is to describe medial tibial stress syndrome, pain on the lower inside of the leg. Often people use it as a term to describe pain and swelling of the muscles to the outside of the shin (anterior compartment syndrome) as well.

 

Chronic symptoms of shin splints may lead to stress fractures so symptoms must not be ignored if they continue to persist. Abnormal biomechanics may lead to a greater risk of pain around the shin bone. A high rigid arch effects shock absorption increasing the forces on the bone. In individuals whose arches fall from normal into a flattened position (excessive pronation) overuse, fatigue and excessive pull of the muscles that support the arch can lead to medial tibial stress syndrome, otherwise known as ‘shin splints.’

 

Weakness of the tendons or ankle instability from previous sprains may also contribute to overuse of muscular and tendinous structures leading to shin splints. Tight calf muscles can also lead to shin pain, excessive tightness can prevent normal ankle movement increasing the load on muscles surrounding the shin.

 

A full history and physical examination including biomechanical assessment with reproduction of symptoms is needed to find the true cause of the symptoms, so a progressive rehabilitation programme can be implemented.

 

Treatment may consist of reducing the repetitive training load, stretching and loosening out tight muscles such as the calves and improving strength. If it is a chronic issue, training to improve shock absorption will be required through altering running mechanics. Assessing and treating the origin of the problem is the key to full recovery.

 

Catherine Simpson

MISCP, MSc. Sports Medicine

www.sportsphysioireland.com

Check out our social media

https://www.facebook.com/sportsphysioireland

https://twitter.com/sportsphyirl


Five Tips So You Can Avoid Injury

Sports Physio Ireland’s physiotherapist Riain Casey talks us through five tips so you can avoid injury.

Many injuries can be easily prevented. Some times small adjustments to our everyday lifestyle can have a big impact in injury prevention.

Simple things like correctly fuelling the body and a good healthy sleeping pattern are key to aiding the body recover from on-field activity. Coupled with a specific warm up to prep the body for the demands on field, good proper movement based training and maintaining fitness levels to meet the demands of the activity can greatly help reduce the risk of injury or re-injury.

Try out the tips and let us know how you get on.

https://www.instagram.com/sportsphysioireland/


Peter Mathews Pre Run Warm Up

With the Dublin marathon approaching it’s important that you implement a decent warm up before you run..

Our running expert and massage therapist Peter Mathews demonstrates a pre run Warm Up. Peter runs everyday and remains injury free because he is dedicated to his strength training, which compliments his running. Have a look at what Peter does during his warm up prior to his run.

Keep an eye out for part two. 


How To Fix Your Push Up

The push up is one of the most basic exercises that you can do, but time and time again it is technically performed poorly.

We see issues from poor technique contribute to low back pain, knee issues, along with a number of other issues. So technique is vital to keep the body healthy.

So how do I, and the rest of the team in Sports Physio Ireland, see a push up? Simple really, think about a dynamic plank.

Quiet simply, the core should be engaged throughout the total body movement, and 9/10 in most injured or poorly trained clients this is the last thing that is thought about!

So How To Do The Perfect Push Up

• Hands directly under the shoulder, screw them into the ground.
• Squeeze the ass, tuck the tail bone under until you feel the lengthening of the abdominals
• Drive the heels to the back wall
• Slowly and controlled bring the chest to the ground, keeping the elbows close to the rib cage and drive up through the heels of the hand.

Harder than you think, but more bang for your buck!


MCL Injuries

We recently seen Karl Lacy tog out and play against Mayo with heavy taping on his leg to protect a recent Medial Collateral ligament (MCL) injury.

The medial collateral ligament is a band of tissue that connects the thighbone to the lower leg and helps prevent the knee from buckiling inwards. It can be injured when twisting or landing or when a standing leg is tackled from the outside forcing it to buckle inwards.

Initial management should be

  • Compress with a bandage
  • Use crutches to take the weight off
  • Apply ice pack

What are the symptoms?

  • Swelling.
  • Pain.
  • Local tenderness on the inside of the joint.
  • Bruising.

Specific tests and scans can diagnose the extent of the damage and the length of time the player will be out of action for. In Karl’s case, he obviously needed more time to regain 100% confidence in his ability the twist and turn to make those turn overs he has been famous for over the past few seasons.

Mild or Grade 1 injuries usually get better in 1 to 3 weeks and may only needhome treatment along with using crutches for a short time.

Moderate or Grade 2 injuries usually get better in about a month. You may need to wear a hinged knee brace and limit how much weight you put on your leg.

Severe or grade 3 injuries may require wearing a hinged brace for a few months, and limiting weight on the leg for 4 to 6 weeks.

 


Hamstring Rehab

The most commonly injured area that occurs in field based sports is the Hamstring. But why the hamstring? It’s an interesting question, with many different potential reasons.

Is it strong enough for the sport? Does it fatigue easy? Is it working too hard, making up for lack of support? Have you done enough sprinting in your training program?

Here is a few exercises that we have in our bag, that can help recruit better hip and hamstring strength and control.

We aim to get you strong to help prevent the possibility of injuring you Hamstring again.

Thomas Divilly