Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy (PHT)

Proximal Hamstring Tendinopathy (PHT)

 

What is it?

A tendinopathy is a change in the tendons structure, usually in response to overload. Unlike what was previously thought, there is no real inflammation happening. The pain is due to the changing and swelling of the tendon’s structure.

PHT manifests itself as a deep pain in the glute. (literally a pain in the butt) .Pain is felt on or around the sitting bone(ischial tuberosity). Pain comes on gradually with no acute onset or mechanism of injury.

PHT is common in runners, but also occurs in the non-athletic population. Oftentimes people can have these symptoms for a long time, and they try to ignore it, until the stage where everyday activities are painful- sitting, going from sit to stand, stretching, sitting on hard surfaces.

 

How did I get this?

If you think you may be suffering from PHT you might ask why me? How did this happen?

Oftentimes a PHT develops after a period of increased training load. Have you increased your mileage, starting adding in hill workouts, more speedwork? All of these disrupt the balance in the tendon, not allowing the tendon enough time to respond and adapt, causing the tendon to become irritable and sore.

Similarly movements which put a compressive load on the hamstring tendon can cause symptoms. Excessive Yoga and pilates stretching positions which involve deep lunging can aggravate the tendon.

 

What do I do?

If you think this sounds like you book in with your physiotherapist for a thorough assessment. There are differential diagnoses which need to be out-ruled such a low back pain, stress fracture of the hip or an SIJ problem.

Keep on top of your pain. NSAIDS (anti-inflammatories) have been seen to be effective in reducing tendon pain. Discuss this with your GP or pharmacist. These should not be taken as a means to mask symptoms while running, but rather if pain is limiting your everyday activities. Heat/Ice can also reduce  your pain, see which works for you.

Gentle isometrics- shown in the picture. These exercises stimulate the muscle, maintaining your strength and have been shown to reduce pain symptoms. Aim to do 5 reps of up to 45 second holds, so long as there is no increase in pain. You may feel some tension but not pain, and symptoms should reduce after the exercise.

 

What do I not do?

There are certain positions and activities to avoid, particularly when the tendon is irritable.

Don’t

-Periods of prolonged sitting, get up and move about to avoid compression on tendon.

-Don’t stretch: allow it may feel like this is what your tendon wants, it is not what it needs. Stretching places further compressive load on the tendon

– Deep lunging/ squatting

-up-hill running

– Don’t ignore your symptoms

 

How long will it take?

The sooner you get assessed the sooner you can get on the road to recovery. Tendon healing and restoration of full strength can take between 3-6 months. Within this period you may have resumed your activity fully and may be completely symptom free.

Once the cause of the tendinopathy has been found, you can start working with your physiotherapist to address this, whether that be pre existing weaknesses, training load management or other areas in your day to day which have led to PHT.

 

 

Ellie Harnett, MISCP