Groin injuries in Athletes

Groin injuries in Athletes

Groin injuries are typically associated with athletes involved in multi-directional fast paced sports such as Hurling and Football.

The incidence of groin injuries in elite Gaelic footballers was shown to be as high as 9% (Murphy et al, 2012).

There are many different causes of groin pain in the sporting athlete, the most common diagnoses including acute groin strains, adductor tendinopathy and osteitis pubis. It can be an extremely debilitating injury associated prolonged periods on the sideline. There are many structures around the hip and groin region that must be considered when managing a groin injury, for instance there are 5 different muscles that act as adductors of the hip. When too much pressure is put on a certain part of the pelvis during movement this can lead to failure of other local tissues. This is often seen in sport when players have an unusual way of cutting/turning which can become problematic over time, thus leading to a groin injury as an example.

Red flags for groin injury often seen in GAA are limited hip ROM, reduced groin strength (groin squeeze) and poor lumbopelvic control, characterised by a player leaning excessively over their planting foot during a cutting movement.

Treatment begins with accurate diagnosis of the pathology as without clarifying the exact cause it is hard to implement a fully functional rehab programme due to the complexity of the hip/groin region. Muscle control and de-loading of affected tissues are two components that I like to focus on when approaching these injuries initially. It is important to introduce sports specific drills when suitable especially in multidirectional sports as the groin muscle has a massive role in decelerating the hip movements during quick turns.

 

Paddy Hannon, MISCP