Acute Groin Injuries in Gaelic Football

Acute Groin Injuries in Gaelic Football

We recently had the pleasure of having Mark Roe present on the “Managing Injury Risk when Performance is the Focus” in Sports Physio Ireland as part of our Educational Seminars. A lot of the data presented was related to the GAA, which is highly relevant as they would make up most of the sporting population that Physiotherapist’s and Sport Therapist’s would see in the clinic setting. A few things really stood out in the seminar, mainly the injury burden that some injuries have on Gaelic Football and Hurling.

Mark presented data that showed that Groin injuries accounted for 14% of the total injury incidence in Gaelic Football, with adductor related accounting for 39% of those groin injuries. What was interesting to note was that out of all those groin injuries 72% where acute in on-set. This goes against the popular belief out there that all groin injuries are chronic in nature, with only 28% of groin injuries classified as chronic in this population. Of the groin sub-classification of injuries (based on the Doha Consensus Statement), pubic-related pain accounted for the greatest time-loss of player availability (Mean Time-Loss 49 days). Thus, knowing that adductor related injuries account for a large portion of injuries in Gaelic Football it’s important to consider injury reduction strategies for this group.

This data follows on nicely from some of Andreas Serner work on acute adductor related injuries. His work has looked at the anatomical location of acute adductor related injuries in a sporting population and found that the adductor longus was involved in 87% of all cases. Isolated injuries accounted for 65% of athletes with multiple muscle injuries in 35% of cases, these with a combination of adductor grevis, pectineus etc. The majority of injuries were graded as 1 or 2 (83%) with 17% grade 3 injuries. Of the avulsion injuries, all where proximal adductor longus avulsions, which where combined with at least two other adductor injuries in all cases. Thus a relatively severe injury.

So as a professional working with GAA teams, knowing that groin injuries account for a large portion of lower limb injuries and which the adductor longus will largely make up the majority of those, putting in strategies looking at training load, strength, hip mobility etc to help reduce these injuries is vital.

 

Thomas Divilly

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